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Title: U.S. to Stick With International Travel RestrictionsCategory: Health NewsCreated: 7/26/2021 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 7/27/2021 12:00:00 AM

Title: Federal, State Moves Begin to Mandate COVID Vaccines for WorkersCategory: Health NewsCreated: 7/27/2021 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 7/27/2021 12:00:00 AM

Title: Long COVID May Qualify as a Disability: BidenCategory: Health NewsCreated: 7/27/2021 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 7/27/2021 12:00:00 AM

Title: Pfizer, Moderna to Expand Vaccine Studies in Young ChildrenCategory: Health NewsCreated: 7/27/2021 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 7/27/2021 12:00:00 AM

Title: High Blood Pressure: Which Drug Works Best?Category: Health NewsCreated: 7/27/2021 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 7/27/2021 12:00:00 AM

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For most patients, the reasons for having a facelift are simple: to "turn back the clock" for a younger and more attractive appearance. Even during the pandemic year 2020, more than 234,000 patients underwent facelift surgery, according to American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) statistics.

Social media sites – especially Instagram – have revolutionized the way plastic surgeons market their practice. These platforms allow surgeons to post testimonials, educational videos and before-and-after photos.

Summer's coming, and for most guys that means shirts are coming off – at the beach, the pool or the jogging path. But some men are embarrassed by the way their chest looks due to the common problem of gynecomastia, or male breast enlargement.

Injectable dermal fillers provide a minimally invasive approach to reduce facial lines and wrinkles while restoring volume and fullness in the face. More than 2.7 million dermal filler procedures were performed in 2019, according to the most recent statistics from the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS).

The American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS) – the world's largest plastic surgery organization, representing nearly 8,000 members – today released the 2020 results of the organization's annual procedure survey coupled with national consumer research reflecting trends during the COVID-19 era to help predict what 2021 will bring.

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The pathophysiology of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) involves multi-organ dysfunction, particularly involving the respiratory, cardiovascular and hematological systems. This dysfunction is partly due to systemic inflammation causing a wide array of pathological sequelae thus posing a significant challenge to management despite the advances in treatment made thus far. In this report, we present a COVID-19 patient who developed a transient complete heart block and was temporarily paced as a complication of a saddle pulmonary embolus (PE). The mechanism of complete heart block is unclear, may be related to strain, ischemia, or vagal response. We believe that this is a unique sequence of events in a COVID-19 patient and, to our knowledge, is the first of its kind to be reported.

Hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP) is one of the group muscle disorders that can cause sudden onset paresis or paralysis. It is a quite rare, yet, potentially life-threatening condition that, if appropriately and promptly diagnosed and treated, can be completely reversed. Other forms of periodic paralysis include thyrotoxic periodic paralysis, hyperkalemic periodic paralysis, and Anderson syndrome. We are presenting a case of a young male who presented to the emergency department (ED) with sudden paralysis to shed light on such a diagnosis and on other differential diagnoses.

Only a few studies are available with appropriate data on the effects of non-aspirin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) use in patients with fatty liver disease. We performed a retrospective study of 1347 patients with imaging studies that showed fatty liver disease from 2016 through 2019. We then determined the change in validated indices using Fibrosis-4 (FIB4) and NAFLD fibrosis score (NFS). Patient clinical information, including NSAIDs use, was collected at baseline and then yearly. Using generalized linear models, we estimated the association between nonaspirin NSAIDs use and change in baseline indices. Non-aspirin NSAIDs use was found to be associated with significant lowering of FIB-4 score (0.596 units lower, p-value <0.0001) and NFS (0.431 units lower, p-value 0.0027) every year.

In this retrospective study of patients with fatty liver disease found on imaging, non-aspirin NSAID use was associated with lowering of fibrosis scores, suggesting that NSAID use might be associated with a lower risk for advanced fibrosis in fatty liver disease.

Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is a hematological condition that is characterized by a low platelet count. ITP can be primary or secondary. Secondary causes are diverse and include viral infections. The novel coronavirus has rarely been recognized as cause of ITP. This is a case of an 82-year-old Caucasian male who was infected by the novel coronavirus four weeks prior. His platelet count on admission was 1,000/mm3. He was diagnosed with ITP caused by the novel coronavirus as there were no other causes for his thrombocytopenia. The patient was treated with platelet infusions, high-dose corticosteroids, and intravenous immunoglobulin infusions.

A new fat-freezing injection may pose significant health risks. Subcutaneous injection of partially frozen normal saline and glycerol has been shown to significantly reduce adipose tissue. This article reports the first human case and adverse reactions following this new procedure.